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Warning as up to 15 kids COLLAPSE and one rushed to A&E after ‘duff jabs’ at school

Warning as up to 15 kids COLLAPSE and one rushed to A&E after ‘duff jabs’ at school

HORROR unfolded at a secondary school after paramedics were called out to treat up to 15 pupils who collapsed after having vaccinations.

Between ten and 15 Year 10 students keeled over after having a meningitis jab at Northampton School for Boys yesterday. One boy was taken to A&E as a “precaution”.

One parent, whose son saw the drama unfold, told how children were seen “on their backs on the floor with their legs up on chairs”.

“The rest of the jabs were cancelled and a letter was sent home to the parents of pupils who had been given the jabs about what to do if they felt nauseous.

“Rumours say there may have been a duff batch of vaccines.”

A letter was sent home to parents of pupils who had been injected, all of whom were later said to be “well”, warning them to seek medical advice if their son began to feel ill.

In the note, the school said it is not known what caused the pupils to fall ill but said the vaccine was withdrawn as a “precaution”.

 The mum, who didn’t want to be named, added: “Vaccines were being administered, and around 10 to 15 pupils keeled over and paramedics were called.
Students offered vaccine against deadly meningitis strain

Students offered vaccine against deadly meningitis strain

First-year university and college students will this year be offered vaccination to protect them against a deadly strain of meningitis, known as MenW.

GPs will be inviting those aged 17 and 18 to come for vaccination protection against meningitis (inflammation of the brain) and septicaemia (blood poisoning) caused by four meningococcal strains including MenW.

The vaccine is being introduced because there has been a rapid increase in cases of the highly aggressive strain of meningococcal disease, group W.

In 2009 there were 22 cases of meningitis caused by the MenW strain. By 2014 there were 117, and it now accounts for about a quarter of all laboratory-confirmed meningococcal cases in England. MenW also has a higher death rate than other strains of the disease.

As well as MenW, the vaccination also protects against other forms of the disease – meningococcal disease types A, C and Y – which can also be fatal or cause long-term complications for those affected. “The rise in MenW is particularly worrying as it causes more severe illness and a higher death rate than other strains,” said Chris Head, of the Meningitis Research Foundation. “That is why we are urging all who are eligible to make sure they get the vaccine.”