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Facial recognition to be used in British supermarkets for the first time

Facial recognition to be used in British supermarkets for the first time

Facial recognition will soon be used in British shops for the first time to judge how old customers are at self-checkout machines when they buy age restricted items, it is understood following a deal with the company that makes the tills for Tesco and Asda.

NCR, who make the software and hardware for self check machines for the majority of the UK’s supermarkets, will integrate a camera that will estimate the age of shoppers when they are buying alcohol and cigarettes.

It will mean a member of staff will not have to intervene to approve a purchase, but instead the machine will scan a person’s face and either accept or deny the sale of the item, without needing to see any official identification from the customer.

The system does not require shoppers to register their identity in advance and does not retain any visual information about users after they have made a purchase.

It follows an announcement made by NCR today that it will introduce the facial recognition software, which was developed by London-based technology company Yoti, in its “FastLane” tills in the next few months.

These tills are currently used by many UK retailers, including Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Marks & Spencer, Boots, and WHSmith.

Read more HERE

Spy cameras could soon know what we’re thinking and feeling simply by scanning our BODIES

Spy cameras could soon know what we’re thinking and feeling simply by scanning our BODIES

The data we share with companies online has become a hot-button issue, but new technologies could soon be scanning us as we go about our day.

That’s the claim made by a neuroscientist, who believes that devices in the real world will start gathering unprecedented levels of information about us.

Our bodies give off various signals that can be scanned and analysed by advanced computer systems, revealing everything from our current mood to our overall health.

In a similar way to wearable gadgets already available, future devices could be set up throughout public spaces to harvest this valuable bio-data.

Because they are part of our surrounding environment there will be no way for us to opt out or ditch the technology and new regulations will be needed, she warns.

Read more here

UK police are now using fingerprint scanners on the streets to identify people in less than a minute

UK police are now using fingerprint scanners on the streets to identify people in less than a minute

Police in the UK have started using a mobile fingerprinting system that lets them check the identity of an unknown person in less than a minute. Fingerprints collected on the street will be compared against the 12 million records contained in national criminal and immigration fingerprint databases and, if a match is found, will return the individual’s name, date of birth and other identifying information.

Officers will only resort to fingerprint scanning if they cannot identify an individual by other means, says Clive Poulton, who helped manage the project at the Home Office. The devices might be used in cases where someone has no identifying information on them, or appears to be giving police a fake name. “[Police] can now identify the person in front of them – whether they are known to them or not known to them, and then they can deal with them,” Poulton says.

 

Read more HERE

​You’re Going to Need an Ad Blocker for Your Next TV

​You’re Going to Need an Ad Blocker for Your Next TV

McMillan was watching the movie through an Amazon Fire set top box, and as an experiment, tried playing it from his computer connected to the TV through an HDMI cable. In both cases the Army ad appeared at the one-minute mark, leading McMillan to deduce that the ad was being served by Samsung, and that the internet-connected TV was using content recognition to show ads on top of any video coming in through the TV’s input.

This seems to be a brand new kind of targeted advertising, McMillan told me. “In this case, it seems to be running some kind of watermarking or audio recognition system on top of anything that’s playing,” he said.

Smart TVs have embedded “automatic content recognition” technology that’s analyzing viewing habits and “sending data to third parties on everything you watch”

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/youre-going-to-need-an-ad-blocker-for-your-next-tv

Yet another reason to hit the ‘OFF” switch?

Coffee shops could be made to collect customers’ web data – Theresa May

Coffee shops could be made to collect customers’ web data – Theresa May

Coffee shops, universities and workplaces might have to collect data on internet use under their networks in case the Government needs it for evidence, Theresa May has said.
She made the comments as she was grilled by a committee scrutinising the draft Investigatory Powers Bill.

Ms May also refused to come clean about whether spies were collecting medical records and other sensitive personal information.

Toys could be used as spying devices, MPs told

Toys could be used as spying devices, MPs told

The security services could remotely take over children’s toys and use them to spy on suspects, MPs have been told.

The draft Investigatory Powers Bill would place a legal duty on internet providers to assist in hacking devices.

But it would not be restricted to phones and PCs, a tech industry chief told the Commons science and technology committee.

Antony Walker, of techUK, said anything that connected to the internet could “in theory” be hacked into.

In the future, this could include driverless cars or household appliances connected to the internet – the so-called Internet of Things – said Mr Walker.

He said the Home Office needed to spell out more clearly where it draws the line over what it calls “equipment interference”, highlighting recent concerns about “smart toys” that connect to the internet and have microphones and cameras built-in.

Read more http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-35043521

GCHQ could ‘grab’ UK shopping data from loyalty cards

GCHQ could ‘grab’ UK shopping data from loyalty cards

Proposed new surveillance laws are so broad they could allow spies to monitor people’s banking and shopping habits, MPs and peers have been told.

The draft Investigatory Powers Bill includes plans to store the online activity of everyone in the UK.

But a lesser-known clause would let the security services download personal details from “bulk” databases.

Internet privacy campaigner Jim Killock claimed it could even include things like the Tesco Clubcard scheme.

It was revealed earlier this year that GCHQ is downloading large amounts of personal data, known as “bulk personal datasets”, under old pieces of legislation.

The Home Office wants to put the practice on a firmer legal footing and has promised tougher safeguards – including six month warrants issued by the home secretary – and judicial oversight.

But Open Rights Group director Jim Killock, giving evidence to the Parliamentary committee examining the draft bill, said it appeared to suggest mass surveillance.

“What is a bulk data set? Which have been accessed and grabbed by GCHQ so far? Who might that apply to?

Read more http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-35060064?ocid=socialflow_twitter

Surveillance can beat the threat.. Here we go!

Surveillance can beat the threat.. Here we go!

THE loss of life in Paris is a chilling reminder of how easy it is for terrorists to commit such an atrocity.

So let’s not kid ourselves. Our security agencies are confronted with an enemy that is highly trained, knows how to remain anonymous and is prepared to die.

The modern-day terrorist is effectively a trained soldier who treats our streets as a battlefield by murdering innocent people.

Simultaneous attacks at several venues mean the security forces struggle to be in the right place at the right time.

They are trying to catch up, rather than quickly stem the violence and identify the perpetrators.

Security agencies rely on intelligence to prevent attacks. There is no doubt that Edward Snowden’s disclosure of surveillance techniques has given terrorists an advantage.

Terrorists tend to target crowded places and iconic sites. Therefore, an effective deterrent is to use uniformed police patrols alongside CCTV monitoring.

There may also be a place for undercover surveillance to investigate suspicious behaviour. But probably the biggest challenge for the Government’s emergency Cobra committee now is to ensure sources of intelligence are cultivated.

Read more http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/6743660/Former-police-chief-Andy-Hayman-says-surveillance-can-beat-terror-threat.html

You have a wifi silhouette

You have a wifi silhouette

Wifi Networks Can Now Identify Who You Are Through Walls

Who needs a peep hole when a wifi network will do? Researchers from MIT have developed technology that uses wireless signals to see your silhouette through a wall—and it can even tell you apart from other people, too.

There is, of course, an elephant in the room here that you wouldn’t even need RF-Capture to identify — and that’s privacy. First off, the team insists that any device using this kind of technology, such as a router that can tell when your relative has fallen, uses encryption from the get-go. “We [also] want to ensure that people do not use it for malicious purposes,” adds Katabi. “To that end, we are working along two fronts: first, we are designing blockers that can prevent someone from being tracked except by their own device. And, second, we need to have regulations that dictate how and when these devices can be used.

Privacy is always a chief concern.”

Really?

Adblock got sold, and nobody knows who the mystery buyer is

Adblock got sold, and nobody knows who the mystery buyer is

Adblock is/was the popular extension for Chrome and Safari – and did what it said on the tin – it blocked ads.

http://uk.businessinsider.com/adblock-gets-sold-acceptable-ads-2015-10?r=US&IR=T

According to The Next Web, the buyer specifically requested that they remain anonymous, and sources tell us that it was not Eyeo, the most obvious candidate.

Adblock reportedly has over 40 million users, and the deal comes at a time when intense scrutiny is being placed on “content blockers” in general. The latest version of iOS includes the ability to install an app that then strips adverts out of webpages, potentially endangering the revenue model of publishers and other businesses.

 

Heads up – be alert for changes