2015 September 18 Home // 2015 September 18

Met creating team to deal with historical child abuse cases

Met creating team to deal with historical child abuse cases

The Metropolitan Police is creating a team of 90 officers and staff to tackle the increasing workload resulting from allegations of historical child abuse.

The new team will handle 29 separate allegations that previous inquiries were blocked because prominent people were identified as suspects.

It will also deal with work resulting from Justice Lowell Goddard’s child abuse public inquiry.

It will consist of reorganised staff rather than new recruits.

The BBC understands the controversial Operation Midland – which is investigating claims of child abuse by establishment figures – will continue as a “standalone operation” because it is also examining allegations of child killings.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34296703

IPCC to oversee a further 12 cases of alleged historical corruption within the Metropolitan Police –

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) is to manage a further 12 investigations detailing allegations of corruption in the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) and one allegation detailing corruption in Essex Police. All relate to child sex offences dating from the 1970s to the 2000s.

The investigations are to be conducted by the MPS Directorate of Professional Standards (DPS) and Essex’s Professional Standards Directorate (PSD) but will be overseen, and have the terms of the investigation set, by the IPCC. The majority of the investigations stem from allegations made by retired MPS officers.

This is in addition to the 17 investigations announced earlier this year. All relate to allegations about:

Anyone else wondering about this?

Set a thief to catch a thief – or cover-up for a thief?
Electronic Warfare Expected in New World of Drones and Anti-Drones

Electronic Warfare Expected in New World of Drones and Anti-Drones

by Nicholas West

As the global drone arms race continues to expand, so do the counter measures.

The proliferation of commercial drones, in particular, is expected to present new challenges to an increasingly crowded sky. Among commercial and military drones is the potential for swarms of micro-drones that can be hidden in plain sight … at least to the naked eye. However, drones are never hidden from the electromagnetic spectrum.

A UK defense firm announced that it is working on a comprehensive defense shield that aims to “control the electromagnetic spectrum”  – electronic warfare. It will not only identify drones that are a threat either to populations or critical infrastructure such as nuclear facilities, military installations, and seats of government, but also will have the ability to hijack the aircraft and remove it from the area.

Selex ES is calling its system Falcon Shield, highlighted in a recent press release:

Easy to make, cheap to buy, simple to fly and hard to detect, commercially available drones are one of the most quickly evolving technological threats to both military and civilian environments. In response to this threat, Finmeccanica – Selex ES has introduced Falcon Shield, which can provide users with a rapidly deployable, scalable and modular system to detect, disrupt, deny and defeat the potential threat.

Read more  http://www.activistpost.com/2015/09/electronic-drone-warfare.html

It’s time to sell up your home OAPs told:

It’s time to sell up your home OAPs told:

Older homeowners who ‘sit quite happily in a very big house’ should be given more encouragement to sell up and downsize, it was claimed yesterday.

Ministers should look at ways to tackle the problem of retired people living in properties that are too big for them, says a major financial watchdog.

A senior official risked the wrath of millions of mortgage-free pensioners who remain in family homes when she said they may need to be steered towards moving to retirement housing.

Time to sell up: Older homeowners who ‘sit quite happily in a very big house’ should be given more encouragement to downsize, a senior official from the Financial Conduct Authority has suggested (file photo)

Lynda Blackwell, head of mortgages at the Financial Conduct Authority, said Britain had a ‘real issue with the last-time buyer’. But her comments were described as ‘insulting’ and ‘unhelpful’ last night.

Critics said older property owners should not be seen as ‘home blockers’.